Home » The Ingenious Ways of Consciousness: Objectifying, Emotional, and Articulate Perception: A Clinical Study by Guillermo A De Le N
The Ingenious Ways of Consciousness: Objectifying, Emotional, and Articulate Perception: A Clinical Study Guillermo A De Le N

The Ingenious Ways of Consciousness: Objectifying, Emotional, and Articulate Perception: A Clinical Study

Guillermo A De Le N

Published October 1st 2012
ISBN : 9781457514074
Paperback
252 pages
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 About the Book 

A Clinical Inquiry into the Meaning and Means of ConsciousnessNeurologic or psychiatric disturbances of perception, emotion, speech, or thought offer us a unique opportunity for looking at the structural framework of the normal mind in aMoreA Clinical Inquiry into the Meaning and Means of ConsciousnessNeurologic or psychiatric disturbances of perception, emotion, speech, or thought offer us a unique opportunity for looking at the structural framework of the normal mind in a disassembled condition. Clinical manifestations of such disorders are like pieces of a puzzle which, if critically examined together, could help us to outline an irreducible mental blueprint that any theory of mind should be consistent with in order to be taken seriously. Thus, any theoretic formulation of the normal human mind must be readily compatible, if distorted by illness or injury, with some bizarre or conceptually perplexing disorders, such as Babinskis anosognosia, constructional apraxia, Anton syndrome, Balint syndrome, infantile autism, pressure of talk, conduction aphasia, thought-echoing and thought-broadcasting, schizophrenic language, multiple personality disorder, or splitbrain syndrome.G. A. de Leon is a retired, board-certified neurologist and neuropathologist. His postgraduate specialty training was at Salpetriere hospital, in Paris- Johns Hopkins and Baltimore City hospitals, in Baltimore- and Institute of Psychiatry, in London. Before his retirement, he worked as neurologist and neuropathologist at Temple University Hospital and St. Christophers Hospital for Children, in Philadelphia- and later, as neuropathologist at Childrens Memorial Hospital, in Chicago. He is the author of various articles on brain malformations and degenerative disorders.