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The Code of 1650: Being a Compilation of the Earliest Laws and Orders of the General Court of Connecticut Connecticut Laws

The Code of 1650: Being a Compilation of the Earliest Laws and Orders of the General Court of Connecticut

Connecticut Laws

Published August 4th 2015
ISBN : 9781332114023
Paperback
124 pages
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 About the Book 

Excerpt from The Code of 1650: Being a Compilation of the Earliest Laws and Orders of the General Court of ConnecticutThe following sheets contain an exact copy of the constitution, or form of civil government, as adopted by the towns of Windsor,MoreExcerpt from The Code of 1650: Being a Compilation of the Earliest Laws and Orders of the General Court of ConnecticutThe following sheets contain an exact copy of the constitution, or form of civil government, as adopted by the towns of Windsor, Hartford and Wethersfield, and the Code of 1650, as confirmed by the General Court of Connecticut. These were both taken from the original records remaining in the office of the Secretary for the State. Much time and accuracy were required to obtain an exact copy, on account of the orthography, and particularly for the reason, that the record, in some parts, was nearly obliterated, and in others, totally gone. Other parts of the record, therefore, have been resorted to, and the copy rendered complete. The ancient orthography has been accurately preserved.This small volume is offered to the public, without apology or comment: nor does the publisher deem it necessary to detail the reasons which induced him to undertake the publication. Only, suffice it to say, that the first revision of the early laws of Connecticut, was never before printed. Prior to the revision of 1672, which was printed in 1675, the laws and orders of the General Court, were promulgated only by manuscript copies. They were recorded in the public records of the court, and also in the town records, and it was made the duty of the constables of the several towns, to publish such laws as should he made from time to time, and, annually to read the capital laws at some public meeting.To this Code may be traced the origin of almost all our civil and religious institutions. Our ancestors have thus, in a great measure, transmitted to their posterity their present customs, manners, and civil and religious opinions. The laws were few and simple, yet they were such as the exigences of the commonwealth required, and such as may be supposed to exist in the infancy of civil governments.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.