Home » Asian Sculpture: Chinese Sculpture, Indian Sculpture, Japanese Sculpture, Korean Sculpture, Sculptures in the Soviet Union by Source Wikipedia
Asian Sculpture: Chinese Sculpture, Indian Sculpture, Japanese Sculpture, Korean Sculpture, Sculptures in the Soviet Union Source Wikipedia

Asian Sculpture: Chinese Sculpture, Indian Sculpture, Japanese Sculpture, Korean Sculpture, Sculptures in the Soviet Union

Source Wikipedia

Published August 16th 2011
ISBN : 9781157973997
Paperback
62 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 61. Chapters: Chinese sculpture, Indian sculpture, Japanese sculpture, Korean sculpture, Sculptures in the SovietMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 61. Chapters: Chinese sculpture, Indian sculpture, Japanese sculpture, Korean sculpture, Sculptures in the Soviet Union, List of National Treasures of Japan, Korean Buddhist sculpture, Bixi, Chola art, Maijishan Grottoes, Monumental propaganda, Harvard Bixi, Seal sculpture, Yungang Grottoes, Longmen Grottoes, Tribhanga, Bund Bull, Jnana Vigraham, Lion Capital of Asoka, Daibutsu, Jadeite Cabbage, Sculpture in India, Korean stone art, Bingling Temple, Tuoshan, Indian iconography, Bisj Pole, Anshan Jade Buddha, Middle Binyang Cave, Maohou, Korean jade carving, South Binyang Cave, North Binyang Cave, Hidden Stream Temple Cave, Six Steeds of Zhao Mausoleum, Rent Collection Courtyard, Twelve Metal Colossi, Suiseki, Shoushan stone carvings. Excerpt: In the mid-6th century, the introduction of Buddhism from Baekje to Japan resulted in a revival of Japanese sculpture. Buddhist monks, artisans and scholars settled around the capital in Yamato Province (present day Nara Prefecture) and passed their techniques to native craftsmen. Consequently, early Japanese sculptures from the Asuka and Hakuh? periods show strong influences of continental art, which initially were characterized by almond-shaped eyes, upward-turned crescent-shaped lips and symmetrically arranged folds in the clothing. The workshop of the Japanese sculptor Tori Busshi, who was strongly influenced by the Northern Wei style, produced works which exemplify such characteristics. The Shakyamuni triad and the Guze Kannon at H?ry?-ji are prime examples. By the late 7th century, wood replaced bronze and copper. By the early Tang Dynasty, greater realism was expressed by fuller forms, long narrow slit eyes, softer facial features, flowing garments and embellishments with ornaments such as bracelets and jewels. Two prominent examples of sculptures of this period are the Sh? Kannon at ...